Nottingham Hospitals History

WILLIAM TRETHOWAN ROWE

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Once described as a man of character with transparent honesty and who had the gift of inspiring his patients with supreme confidence, earning him the respect and devotion of all the nursing staff at the Nottingham General Hospital. Apart from volunteering as a civil surgeon in 1899 to the Imperial Forces during the Boer War and seeing action at the relief of Mafeking in 1900, in 1905 he was gazetted Surgeon Lieutenant to the South Nott’s Hussars.


When war broke out in 1914, he was called up and appointed as Medical Officer not only to the South Nott’s Hussars but the Sherwood Rangers, and the Derbyshire Yeomanry as well. He eventually sailed east in April 1915 and then on to Gallipoli in the August.


Among the burning scrub and under heavy fire, he set up a field hospital in Suvla Bay, which on the first day of fighting saw 5,300 casualties.


For his service in Gallipoli he was mentioned in dispatches and awarded the Military Cross. However, in September 1915 he was invalided home with paratyphoid, from which he recovered, and on his return to duty was posted to a hospital in the UK.


After his period of home service he was eventually posted to Base Hospital in France where in February, 1917 he became officer in charge.


After the war ended in 1918 he was demobilised with the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel.


A History of the General Hospital near Nottingham, Frank Jacob




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